KC 1844 p1.JPG
KC 1844 p1.JPG
KC 1844 p2.JPG
KC 1844 p2.JPG
KC 1844 p3.JPG
KC 1844 p3.JPG
KC 1844 p4.JPG
KC 1844 p4.JPG
KC 1844 p5.JPG
KC 1844 p5.JPG
KC 1844 p6.JPG
KC 1844 p6.JPG

Details

The Illustrierte Zeitung was a newspaper published in Leipzig. An issue in 1844 focussed on Cologne’s carnival and provided historical background as well as a report on its masquerade processions. It’s cover page bears the title Kölnischer Karneval formed out of soldiers in various states of drunkenness or foolery. These soldiers were part of the Rote Funken, the carnival military of Cologne so to say. The Rote Funken took their name, dress and behaviour from the imperial militia of Cologne before French occupation in the 1790s. It is said, that Cologne was surrendered to the French without the militia putting up a fight, because they were too drunk respectively incapable to organise their city’s defence. Denounced as most incapable soldiers in German-speaking states, they provided a great historical identity and connection for Cologne’s carnival, bridging the old medieval imperial past with the new romantic bourgeois associational carnival. The humanised lettering can also be found in the 1848 Narhalla, Mainz’ carnival journal.

By 1844, Franz Raveaux, future parliamentarian in the Frankfurt Assembly of 1848, split from the Große Kölner Karnevalsgesellschaft to found his own association, the Allgemeine Karnevalsgesellschaft. Disputes about content, organisation and participation were ongoing since about 1827, where the first oppositional carnival’s newspaper criticised the elitist speeches, content and demeanour of the carnival committee. Raveaux aimed to change this as he saw great political, especially democratic, potential in the yearly assemblies, committees, presidentships, masquerades, speeches and celebrations. More specifically, Raveaux aimed to bridge the old upper classes holding power in Cologne alongside the upcoming middle classes of merchants, lawyers and doctors with the smaller merchants and especially artisans that had gained reputation and capital. His vision was a more egalitarian and political one compared to the romantic and elitist one the older carnival association held.

The visually stunning issue provides a view on Cologne’s carnival from a Northern German perspective and does not fall short in appealing to its readers to open up more and follow the Southern German wit and humour that seems to be overall lacking. Significant is the depiction of the president of, presumably, the older carnival association sporting a hat that bears resemblance to a spiked helmet (Pickelhaube). The Pickelhaube was introduced to the Prussian military in 1842. Depicting the inflexible, elitist carnival association’s president wearing such head gear highlights the political affiliation of the Leipziger Illustrierte Zeitung as well as Franz Raveaux’ journalistic, business or even political connections across Germany.

Women are only depicted as Colonia or as part of a masquerade set. The illustrations highlight how Colonia, the female incarnation of the city of Cologne, has nurtured Hanswurts, or the Schalknarr, into maturity. This is echoed in the accompanying text, stating that Raveaux’ association has established Hanswurst maturity (‘Mündigkeit’ p.3) – referring to his coming of age and thus political say.

This newspaper highlights the growing politicisation of carnival in Cologne and its reception ‘aborad’ in the Kingdom of Saxony, to which Leipzig belonged, and elsewhere.

Geolocation